COVID-19 - Canada Facts

Thu, 28 May 2020

CISS understands the importance of reliable and current facts about the COVID-19 situation in Canada so that you and your clients can make informed decisions. Below is an update as of May 28: 

  • The number of daily new cases in Canada is steadily decreasing.  All provinces are reporting gradual declines.   
  • Canada remains one of the leading countries in terms of percentage of the population tested and has increased this metric from 2.5% to 4% in recent weeks. 
  • All provinces are responsibly starting to reopen the economy and public life with multi-phased plans which depend upon specific metrics (e.g. a drop in the number of new daily cases, adequate hospital capacity, etc.)  
  • Schools remain closed in most provinces. They will reopen in September with new physical space protocols which we expect to be announced in the next few weeks.  
  • The health care system is stable across the country, and all provinces are reporting adequate capacity in hospitals and urgent care centres.  

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Wed, 06 May 2020

CISS understands the importance of reliable and current facts about the COVID-19 situation in Canada so parents and students can make informed decisions. Here is some highlighted information:

  • The number of cases in Canada continues to rise and has not yet peaked; the first wave is predicted to be over sometime in June.  
  • Canada is one of the leading countries in terms of percentage of the population tested (approximately 2.5%) 
  • 5% of positive cases require hospitalization in Canada, with 95% recovering at home. 
  • Only 5% of cases of coronavirus infection in Canada are individuals ≤ 19 years of age; no one under the age of 19 has died of COVID-19 in Canada to date. 
  • The elderly population is the most vulnerable to COVID-19 in Canada - 67% of deaths have been over 80 years of age, and 28% were over 60; combined, 96% of all COVID-19 related deaths in Canada are people over the age of 60.  
  • Low-density, small communities in Ontario have significantly lower rates of infection than large, dense population centres like Toronto.

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